The Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis Foundation Newsletter

Call for Society Prizes | 2021 Congress SOCIETY PRIZES CNSF members have the opportunity to win valuable society prizes by submitting ‘Abstracts’ to the Congress as well as an ‘Expanded Abstracts’ to the society prize competitions. There are multiple first place prizes available to Junior Members or an Active Member within two years of receiving their certificate. Each valued at approximately $2500. Winners have the privilege of presenting their work at the Grand Plenary, alongside our Distinguished Guest Lecturers, during the Congress. Prize winners’ will be announced in the Neuro|News newsletter, in the Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences and on the CNSF website. $500 second place prizes and additional subsidiary prizes may be awarded. Rules governing all Society Prize Submissions Authors are invited to submit an expanded abstract, on or before April 30, 2021 Contestants must be a member in good standing with any one of the five Societies of the CNSF; a Junior member or an Active member within two years of receiving their certificate. (Become a Member | CNSF) The same person may submit on different topics for the same prize The same expanded abstract may not be submitted to more than one Society Submissions must be provided in PDF format Those submitting an expanded abstract for a Society Prize must also submit their basic abstract to the CNSF Congress, on the official online abstract submission site. The Congress Abstract submission process is independent from the Society Prize submission process. Submission Details Prize submissions accepted by email ONLY Clearly indicate name of Society Prize you are submitting for Submissions must be submitted as three separate PDF files label: last name_ ‘Letter’ from their program chair ‘Biography’ ‘Expanded Abstract’ (include abstract number) CNSF will send a receipt of confirmation within 5 business days. If you do not receive a receipt of confirmation after 6 business days please contact the CNSF at nicole-rozak@cnsf.org The Canadian Neurological Society (CNS) Francis McNaughton Memorial Prize André Barbeau Memorial Prize Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis Foundation Prize The Canadian Neurosurgical Society (CNSS) K.G. McKenzie Memorial Prize for Basic Neuroscience Research Prize K.G. McKenzie Memorial Prize for Clinical Neuroscience Research Prize The Canadian Society of Clinical Neurophysiologists (CSCN) Herbert Jasper Prize The Canadian Association of Child Neurology (CACN) President’s Prize The Canadian Society of Neuroradiology (CSNR) CSNR Society Prize

 




Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) has been a key immunotherapeutic strategy in numerous neurological syndromes, predominantly during the acute phase of illness. This paper reviews the indications, …

 




Background To explore the characteristics and prognosis of autonomic dysfunction and paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH), and evaluate the efficacy of drugs used to suppress PSH episode in anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients.MethodsPat…

 




Anti-NMDAR encephalitis in infants and toddlers clinically presents with movement disorders, developmental regression, and abnormal behaviors. Interestingly, this group had a higher proportion of patients after viral encephalitis, which is regarded as the only risk factor for poor outcomes.

 




The causes of encephalitis are numerous, and extensive investigations for infectious agents and other etiologies are often negative. The discovery that many of these encephalitis are immune mediated has changed the approach to the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders.

 




Considering the similarities with other pandemics due to respiratory virus infections and subsequent development of neurological disorders (e.g. encephalitis lethargica after the 1918 influenza), there is growing concern about a possible new wave of neurological complications following the…

 




Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (anti-NMDA) receptor encephalitis is an immune-mediated syndrome that is still under-recognised, with grave consequences if not treated early.A multidisciplinary team approach is required in the process of diagnosis and management of this potentially treatable and reversib…

 




Abstract Objective To evaluate the validity of the 2016 clinical diagnostic criteria proposed for probable anti-NMDA receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis in children, we tested the criteria in a Japanese pediatric cohort. Methods We retrospectively reviewed clinical information of patients with neurologic symptoms whose CSF was analyzed for NMDAR antibodies (NMDAR-Abs) in our laboratory from January 1, 2015, to March 31, 2019. Results Overall, 137 cases were included. Of the 41 cases diagnosed as probable anti-NMDAR encephalitis (criteria-positive) according to the 2016 criteria, 13 were positive and 28 were negative for anti–NMDAR-Abs. Of the 96 criteria-negative cases, 3 were positive and 93 were negative for anti–NMDAR-Abs. The sensitivity of the criteria was 81.2%, specificity was 76.9%, positive predictive value (PPV) was 31.7%, and negative predictive value was 96.9%. Compared with the true-positive group, the false-positive group contained more male than female patients (male:female, 4:9 in the true-positive vs 19:9 in the false-positive group, p = 0.0425). The majority of the cases with false-positive diagnoses were associated with neurologic autoimmunity. Conclusion The clinical diagnostic criteria are reliable for deciding to start immunomodulatory therapy in the criteria-positive cases. Low PPV may be caused by a lower prevalence of NMDAR encephalitis or lower level of suspicion for encephalitis in the pediatric population. Physicians should therefore continue differential diagnosis, focusing especially on other forms of encephalitis. Classification of Evidence This study provides Class IV evidence that the proposed diagnostic criteria for anti-NMDAR encephalitis in children has a sensitivity of 81.2% and a specificity of 76.9%. Glossary AMPAR=α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor; CASPR2=contactin-associated protein-like 2; CI=confidence interval; GABABR=γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor; GFP=green fluorescence protein; HSV=herpes simplex virus; IgG=immunoglobulin G; LGI1=leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1; MOG=myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein; NMDAR=NMDA receptor; NMDAR-Abs=NMDA receptor antibodies; PPV=positive predictive value Footnotes Go to Neurology.org/N for full disclosures. Funding information and disclosures deemed relevant by the authors, if any, are provided at the end of the article. Class of Evidence: NPub.org/coe CME Course: NPub.org/cmelist Received June 12, 2020. Accepted in final form January 25, 2021. © 2021 American Academy of Neurology

 




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