The Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis Foundation Newsletter

Immunotherapeutic strategies for GAD65-AE remain highly controversial.27 Most patients are considered to require immunotherapy, and early immunotherapy has been found to be associated with a better outcome.10,28 However, the different neurologic manifestations of SPS, CA, and LE appear to respond…

 




Anti-N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis has been reported after SARS-CoV-2 infection, but not after SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. We report the first known case of anti-NMDAR encephalitis after SARS-CoV-2 immunization in a young female presenting with acute psychosis,…

 




When you have a disease only recently discovered and most doctors don’t know it exists, it takes strong self-advocacy to get the help you need.

 




Knowledge about the diagnosis of autoimmune encephalitis (AE) is rapidly expanding. In the last 15 years, multiple new antibodies have been described. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)–antibody-mediated encephalitis, in particular, has been found to be common among teenagers and young adults1 and accounts for up to 86% of AE in patients aged <18 years.2 Other antibodies associated with AE (leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1, contactin-associated protein-like 2, glutamic acid decarboxylase 65-kilodalton isoform, γ-aminobutyric acid A, and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) are reported in children as case reports or series and with less clear typical clinical syndromes.3–9

 




Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis (anti-NMDARE) and anti-leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 encephalitis (anti-LGI1E) are the two most common types of antibody-mediated autoimmune encephalitis.

 




AIM To characterize the neurological and cognitive outcomes in children with antibody-negative autoimmune encephalitis (Ab-negative AE). METHOD A cohort of children presenting to our institution ov…

 




RESULTS: Four hundred and fifty records were initially identified, of which 197 were included in the review. The selected studies were retrospective case-control (n=11), case series (n=83), and case reports (n=103) and overall described 1334 patients both of paediatric and adult age. Aetiology remains unexplained in about half of the cases, representing the so-called “cryptogenic NORSE”. Among adult patients without cryptogenic NORSE, the most often identified cause is autoimmune encephalitis, either non-paraneoplastic or paraneoplastic. Infections are the prevalent aetiology of paediatric non-cryptogenic NORSE. Genetic and congenital disorders can have a causative role in NORSE, and toxic, vascular, and degenerative conditions have been also described.

 




Patients with autoimmune encephalitides, especially those with antibodies to the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), often present with prominent psychosis and respond well to immunotherapies. Although most patients progress to develop various neurological symptoms, it has been hypothesised…

 




CSF in antibody-defined autoimmune encephalitis (AE) subtypes shows subtype-dependent degrees of inflammation ranging from rare and often mild to frequent and often robust. AEs with NMDA receptor antibodies (NMDAR-E) and leucine-rich glioma-inactivated …

 




Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is the most common cause of
autoimmune encephalitis after acute demyelinating encephalitis. Patients usually present
with acute behavioral changes, psychosis, and abnormal limb movements and can also

 




In 2019, Dana Mitchell, a fourth-year medical student at IU School of Medicine, was diagnosed with autoimmune encephalitis&mdash;a brain inflammation that wreaks neurological havoc. In search of a therapy that would provide lasting relief of her debilitating symptoms, Mitchell reviewed 40…

 




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